Rarely has it been so eloquently put:

I have created a heterosexual dating history to recite to fellow cadets when they inquire. I have endured unwanted approaches by male cadets for fear of being accused as a lesbian by rejecting or reporting these events. I have been coerced into ignoring derogatory comments towards homosexuals for fear of being alienated for my viewpoint.  In short, I have lied to my classmates and compromised my integrity and my identity by adhering to existing military policy.

While at the academy, I have made a deliberate effort to develop myself academically, physically, and militarily, but in terms of holistic personal growth I have reached a plateau. I am unwilling to suppress an entire portion of my identity any longer because it has taken a significant personal, mental, and social toll on me and detrimentally affected my professional development. I have experienced a relentless cognitive dissonance by attempting to adhere to §654 [colloquially known as "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"] and retain my integrity, and I am retrospectively convinced that I am unable to live up to the Army Values as long as the policy remains in place.

The above is an excerpt from the resignation of Cadet Katherine Miller. By every measure, Cadet Miller has been an exemplary officer candidate. As Andrew Exum put it, “Katherine Miller is exactly the kind of person we need in the ranks of our nation’s junior officer corps.” But because of the military’s discriminatory policy towards homosexuals, she resigned, and the Army lost exactly the sort of person it needs more of.